More selected projects

We Close our Eyes and See a Flock of Birds

We Close our Eyes and See a Flock of Birds, 2013  18We Close our Eyes and See a Flock of Birds, 2013  18

Installation views: I look to you and I see nothing, Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah 
Beam in Thine Own Eye, MoNA Museum, Hobart, Tasmania. Festiva of Future Nows, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Photographs: Ivana Franke Studio

We Close our Eyes and See a Flock of Birds

2013. Wooden construction, polystyrene panels, white LED-lights,
micro-controller, bench. 203 x 206 x 206 cm. 
Frequency range of flickering lights: 10 – 33 Hz. Each flash duration 6 mins.
Duration of the sequence 6 mins 24 secs.

Up to five visitors are invited to sit on a bench in the middle of the cylindrical room, in which the screen of numerous LED lights covers the wall, and to close their eyes. Within their minds they see a stream of images: birds flying, people passing by, circles and spirals swirling and whatever else they can imagine. Each person “constructs” his/ her very own “movie”, a possible reminiscence of something long forgotten.

LED lights are programmed to flicker and visitors are exposed to the flashing light, which gives rise to a quasi-hallucinatory visual experience of moving images behind their closed eyes. The subjective hallucinatory “movie” is enclosed in one’s mind and imperceptible to anyone else, yet the experience of seeing is shared.

Installation views: I look to you and I see nothing, Sharjah Art Foundation, Sharjah 
Beam in Thine Own Eye, MoNA Museum, Hobart, Tasmania. Festiva of Future Nows, Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin. Photographs: Ivana Franke Studio

Visual experiences

In conjunction with the conference event Eternity, a project by Hannah Hurtzig and Mobile Academy in Haus der Wissenschaft in Braunschweig, where the installation was exhibited, students of IAK, TU Braunschweig experienced the installation.
Participants were asked to draw images of what they saw with their eyes closed. Quasi-hallucinatory visual experience ranged from simple dot patterns to complex events.